“…Heaven holds a place for those who pray…”























“Mrs. Robinson” – Simon & Garfunkel (1968)
“Mrs. Robinson” – The Lemonheads (1993)

(23 Photos)

This stunning building, located at Euclid Avenue and East 82nd Street– today the Liberty Hill Baptist Church, was built in 1912, originally as The Euclid Avenue Temple for the Anshe Chesed German Orthodox Jewish congregation, today the oldest Jewish congregation in Cleveland.

Designed by the Cleveland architectural firm, Lehman and Schmitt in Neoclassical style, the synagogue featured a symmetrical plan with a semicircular 1,400 capacity auditorium.  It also was adorned with beautiful stained glass windows designed by Louis Tiffany.

Following World War II, as members of the growing Jewish congregation began establishing residence in the eastern suburbs–the need for a larger Temple facility, more convenient to the eastern suburbs became apparent. Also growing at the time in the Fairfax neighborhood surrounding The Euclid Avenue Temple was Cleveland’s African-American Baptist population.

Eventually a site on Fairmount Boulevard in the eastern suburb of Beachwood was selected, and in May of 1957, the new Fairmount Temple was dedicated and the Euclid Avenue Temple was sold to Liberty Hill Baptist Church.

Photos taken August 27, 2015

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5 responses

  1. The close-up shots that emphasize lines and angles, cool diagonals—really like those.

    Liked by 1 person

    September 13, 2015 at 9:58 pm

    • Really a visually appealing structure the closer you get to it. I agree with you, the lines and the geometrical patterns grab your attention. I also love the many different textures that the architects used throughout the exterior. Up close it is so beautiful!

      Like

      September 13, 2015 at 10:39 pm

  2. beautiful…and loving all he details too.

    Liked by 1 person

    September 14, 2015 at 1:47 am

  3. A thousand and one ways with brick, an object lesson in how to create interesting patterns and textures without being fussy and trite — and all brought out by the stark simplicity of black and white photography. Stunning, both original and medium.

    Liked by 1 person

    September 14, 2015 at 2:44 am

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