“…with or without you…”









“With Or Without You”
– U2 (1987)

In 1886, the above structure was the carriage house built for Morris A. Bradley, and his wife, Anna A. Leininger-Bradley. The couple was married in Cleveland on May 10, 1883 and three years later had a luxurious English Manor mansion built on Euclid Avenue and Otis Street (E. 73rd Street.) The three-story, 2,500 square-foot carriage house was built directly behind the residence, nestle-in facing Otis Street at the corner of Simpson Avenue N.E. The new Bradley family homestead was the latest addition to Cleveland’s magnificent “Millionaires Row”– Euclid Avenue.

A map showing the Bradley Residence and carriage house (outlined in red.) From the “Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Ohio, v 1 Hopkins, 1921” – Courtesy of the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery.

And Morris Bradley was, indeed, a Millionaire.

Born in Cleveland in 1859, Morris A. Bradley was the son of a prominent Great Lakes shipbuilder and wealthy businessman.  Upon the death of his father in 1875, Morris took over all of the family’s business interests and was mightily prosperous.

During his lifetime, he grew his businesses and became one of Cleveland’s largest owners of real estate.  Among his accomplishments, he was President of the Cleveland and Buffalo Transportation Company, President of the United States Coal Company, President of the Bradley Electrical Company, President of the State National Bank (First National Bank of Cleveland,) and held lower-level positions in several other companies. As a respected member of the community, Mr. Bradley enjoyed membership in many fraternal and social clubs, including the Union Club (previously highlighted at this site, HERE .)


 Today, all that is left of the Bradley estate is a grassy lot where the expansive residence once stood and the Bradley carriage house. As was the fate of so many of the Euclid Avenue mansions, the dwelling was eventually torn down. Still present, in small, scattered places on the empty lot are remnants of the old house and it’s demolition.






Walking the grounds on that city street corner, it is difficult to envision the Bradley Mansion occupying the land– the land where the Bradley’s five children played in the front yard as horse drawn carriages and eventually motor cars made their way up and down the historic avenue.

 

 

The Morris A. Bradley house at 7217 Euclid Ave, from page 147 of “Showplace of America: Cleveland’s Euclid Avenue, 1850-1910” by Jan Cigliano

Morris A. Bradley portrait: from pg. 429 of “A History of Cleveland and Its Environs: The Heart of New Connecticut, Volume 2” by Elroy McKendree Avery (1918). Anna A. Bradley portrait: From pg. 46 of Ancestors & descendants of Morris A. Bradley” Compiled for Mr. Alva Bradley by Mrs. Grant Rideout (1948)

Except where noted, the above photos were taken on November 4, 2014 and August 19, 2015.

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One response

  1. another excellent post

    Like

    April 16, 2016 at 12:19 am

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