brick

“…everything zen… I don’t think so.”












I would drive by this old terrace apartment complex all the time… “The Emrose” definitely had seen better days.  In a troubled area on Cedar Avenue, in Cleveland’s east side Fairfax neighborhood, the Emrose is just one of too many structures that has fallen into disrepair and left for dead over the years. And for safety reasons, the buildings in this condition all eventually meet the same fate. After photographing the premises the first time, I happened back a few weeks later, and by chance caught the process of demolition.  The Emrose was built in 1907.










A green field now, like so many green plots of land throughout the city, where structures from yesterday once stood.

The Emrose Terrace Apartments complex was designed by Architect Edward E. Smith.

Smith was born in Cleveland in 1869 and attended Central High School. After high school he learned the craft of design working as a draftsman under Architect Fenimore C. Bate until 1889. Like Mr. Bate, Edward E. Smith began designing apartment and terraces throughout the City of Cleveland.

Most of the over 50 buildings and homes that were designed by Smith have been demolished over the years. But a few still do exist.

(above) The “Lucretia” Terrace Apartments built in 1905 at 4301 Woodbine, in Cleveland’s Ohio City Neighborhood.

(above) A private residence at 10324 Lake Avenue, on the city’s northwest side designed by Smith and built in 1925.

(above) At the intersection of Central Avenue and East 73rd Street, an Edward E. Smith designed Terrace building built in 1904.

(above) A Smith designed apartment building built in 1908, at 11201 Hessler Road, near the campus of Case-Western Reserve University.

(above) Just one block north of where The Emrose once stood, the beautiful Monticello apartment building sits at 7102 Carnegie Avenue, built in 1899, and designed by Edward E. Smith.


Etched into the foundation stone of the Monticello: the building’s architect, Edward E. Smith.

“Everything Zen” – BUSH (1995)

Photo of Edward E. Smith from the March 1905 edition of “The Ohio Architect and Builder”

Other Photos taken:
August 5,6, 2015
September 28, 2015
September 30, 2015
October 2, 2015
February 2, 2016
August 2, 2016
September 15, 2016


“We’ve been waiting so long… …we need just one victory and we’re on our way…”

Game three of the 2016 NBA Finals… Cavs are down 2 – 0 in a best of 7 Series against the Golden State Warriors…Photo taken on May 31, 2016 on Carnegie Avenue near East 30th Street.

“Just One Victory” – Todd Rundgren (1973)

We’ve been waiting so long,
We’ve been waiting so long,
We’ve been waiting for the sun to rise and shine
Shining still to give us the will

Can you hear me, the sound of my voice?
I am here to tell you I have made my choice
I’ve been listening to what’s been going down
There’s just too much talk and gossip going ’round

You may think that I’m a fool, but I know the answer
Words become a tool, anyone can use them
Take the golden rule, as the best example
Eyes that have seen will know what I mean

The time has come to take the bull by the horns
(Hold that line, baby hold that line, get up boys and hit ’em one more time)
We’ve been so downhearted, we’ve been so forlorn
(We may be losing now but we can’t stop trying, so hold that line, baby hold that line)
We get weak and we want to give in
(Hold that line, baby hold that line, get up boys and hit ’em one more time)
But we still need each other if we want to win
(We may be losing now but we can’t stop trying, so hold that line, baby hold that line)

If you don’t know what to do about a world of trouble
You can pull it through if you need to and if
You believe it’s true, it will surely happen
Shining still, to give us the will

We’ve been waiting so long,
We’ve been waiting so long,
We’ve been waiting for the sun to rise and shine
Shining still to give us the will
Bright as the day, to show us the way

Somehow, someday,
We need just one victory and we’re on our way
Prayin’ for it all day and fightin’ for it all night
Give us just one victory, it will be all right

We may feel about to fall but we go down fighting
You will hear the call if you only listen
Underneath it all we are here together
Shining still to give us the will
Bright as the day, to show us the way

Somehow, someday,
(Hold that line, baby hold that line, get up boys and hit ’em one more time)
We need just one victory and we’re on our way
(We may be losing now but we can’t stop trying, so hold that line, baby hold that line)
Prayin’ for it all day and fightin’ for it all night
(Hold that line, baby hold that line, get up boys and hit ’em one more time)
Give us just one victory, it will be all right
(We may be losing now but we can’t stop trying, so hold that line, baby hold that line)


“…you’re ageless, timeless, lace and fineness… you’re beauty and elegance…”


















 

“You’re In My Heart” – Rod Stewart (1977)

The Cleveland Carnegie West Library is one of the over 2,500 public libraries that were built around the world with grant funds from industrial giant and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It is among 104 Carnegie built public libraries in Ohio, and one of 14 in Cleveland. The very first Carnegie Library was opened in 1883 in the city of Dunfermline, Scotland, where Andrew Carnegie was born.

The Carnegie West Library was built at 1900 Fulton Road in Cleveland’s near-westside neighborhood of Ohio City in 1910. It was designed in a Modified Renaissance architectural style with elements of Classical style. Chosen to design the building was Edward Lippincott Tilton, a New York Architect, who designed over 100 libraries in the United States and Canada over the span of his career. The outer construction materials consist of brick, limestone and terra cotta.

Today, the Official Designated Cleveland Landmark– Carnegie West Library, at 25,000 square feet in size, is the largest branch in the Cleveland Public Library system. In 1979 the Library was completely renovated and restored after many years of deterioration. The terra cotta columns and ornate trim were restored utilizing a special epoxy injection and coating technique which saved the, in some cases, cracked and crumbling exterior to it’s beautiful original condition. The American Institute of Architects recognized the restoration project with their prestigious Preservation and Design Award.

Monochrome photos taken April 8, 2016
Color photos taken May 10, 2016


“I’ve been aware of the time going by… they say in the end it’s the wink of an eye…”

 

Hanging-on by a thread on Cleveland’s Lexington Avenue– an old farmhouse built and lived-in in the mid to late 1850’s by accomplished shipbuilder, and land owner, Luther Moses. Moses was born in West Farmington, Ohio in 1811, moving with his 6 brothers and sisters to Cleveland when he was five years old.

The old house originally faced west toward then Willson Street (East 55th Street) but sometime after Luther Moses died in 1895, the house was converted to a Lexington Avenue address with adjustments made to the original right side of the house, rendering it the “new” front, facing south.

Moses owned significant land in the general vacinity, which was on the “outskirts” of Cleveland at the time the house was built. Eventually the land was parceled off with additional streets created. New houses were built– today one of these houses still sits on the lot to the left of the old Moses House, on what was once the front yard of the farmhouse facing Willson Street.

According to local historians, the Luther Moses House is estimated to have been built in 1854, shortly after Mr. Moses retired as a wealthy ship manufacturer.  Cleveland librarian and historian, Christopher Busta-Peck, believes the house “… is of a finish quality unmatched in pre-Civil War construction in the city of Cleveland, east of the Cuyahoga River...”

The building is in rough shape today. In an inner city neighborhood that struggles against poverty, crime, and urban decay, the antebellum home seems bunkered down, patiently in waiting for a rebirth.











The interior of the structure has been stripped of almost everything that once made it a home. What does remain is much of the original woodwork, door and window framing, and two first floor fireplaces. There is evidence, as well, of redesign– both from when the “front” of the house changed from Willson Avenue/East 55th Street to it’s current Lexington Avenue front facing, as well as when, some time along the way, the structure was converted to a multi-unit dwelling. It was fascinating, if not a bit unsettling, to explore the cellar that Luther Moses must have utilized toward the end of his life. So many raw nooks and crannies that still exist in amongst the original disheveled stone foundation.













 

Almost unseen from today’s busy East 55th Street, the old Luther Moses farm house is another surviving urban historic relic, and official Cleveland Landmark that needs to be saved. From historical accounts, Luther Moses was a generous man with a big heart. He gave his wealth away during his lifetime, to those in need. I really do hope that his generosity can somehow be “paid forward” decades later, and the house at 5611 Lexington Avenue will be restored and preserved, for future generations.

The Pretender – Jackson Browne (1976)

Photos taken on May 12, August 27, and September 17, 2015.


“…with or without you…”









“With Or Without You”
– U2 (1987)

In 1886, the above structure was the carriage house built for Morris A. Bradley, and his wife, Anna A. Leininger-Bradley. The couple was married in Cleveland on May 10, 1883 and three years later had a luxurious English Manor mansion built on Euclid Avenue and Otis Street (E. 73rd Street.) The three-story, 2,500 square-foot carriage house was built directly behind the residence, nestle-in facing Otis Street at the corner of Simpson Avenue N.E. The new Bradley family homestead was the latest addition to Cleveland’s magnificent “Millionaires Row”– Euclid Avenue.

A map showing the Bradley Residence and carriage house (outlined in red.) From the “Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Ohio, v 1 Hopkins, 1921” – Courtesy of the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery.

And Morris Bradley was, indeed, a Millionaire.

Born in Cleveland in 1859, Morris A. Bradley was the son of a prominent Great Lakes shipbuilder and wealthy businessman.  Upon the death of his father in 1875, Morris took over all of the family’s business interests and was mightily prosperous.

During his lifetime, he grew his businesses and became one of Cleveland’s largest owners of real estate.  Among his accomplishments, he was President of the Cleveland and Buffalo Transportation Company, President of the United States Coal Company, President of the Bradley Electrical Company, President of the State National Bank (First National Bank of Cleveland,) and held lower-level positions in several other companies. As a respected member of the community, Mr. Bradley enjoyed membership in many fraternal and social clubs, including the Union Club (previously highlighted at this site, HERE .)


 Today, all that is left of the Bradley estate is a grassy lot where the expansive residence once stood and the Bradley carriage house. As was the fate of so many of the Euclid Avenue mansions, the dwelling was eventually torn down. Still present, in small, scattered places on the empty lot are remnants of the old house and it’s demolition.






Walking the grounds on that city street corner, it is difficult to envision the Bradley Mansion occupying the land– the land where the Bradley’s five children played in the front yard as horse drawn carriages and eventually motor cars made their way up and down the historic avenue.

 

 

The Morris A. Bradley house at 7217 Euclid Ave, from page 147 of “Showplace of America: Cleveland’s Euclid Avenue, 1850-1910” by Jan Cigliano

Morris A. Bradley portrait: from pg. 429 of “A History of Cleveland and Its Environs: The Heart of New Connecticut, Volume 2” by Elroy McKendree Avery (1918). Anna A. Bradley portrait: From pg. 46 of Ancestors & descendants of Morris A. Bradley” Compiled for Mr. Alva Bradley by Mrs. Grant Rideout (1948)

Except where noted, the above photos were taken on November 4, 2014 and August 19, 2015.


“I’m working so hard… to keep you in the luxury…”



















Back when the Wade Park Manor was new–A photo taken from roughly the same perspective as the photo above. Photo courtesy of http://www.judsonsmartliving.org/judson-manor/


A postcard from the 1930’s — an artistic rendering of Wade Park Manor, with Wade Park in the foreground.


“Luxury” – The Rolling Stones (1974)

(21 Photos)

Elaborate parties, and the inter-mingling of local artists, musicians, business giants and top-national performing acts– all either stayed here as visitors or lived here as residents, and all were treated to only the best during their stay. It was the high-life in the roaring Twenties.

And it was in 1923, in the area today known as University Circle, that the lavish Wade Park Manor residential hotel was opened.

George A. Schneider, the former developer/manager of The Cleveland Athletic Club, took the reigns of the Wade Park Project and decided on the New York architectural firm of George Post & Sons, who had a Cleveland office, to design the building. Among the Cleveland projects that the firm was responsible for, The Cleveland Trust Building (1908) at East 9th Street and Euclid Avenue is most notable.

The 11-story, 400 room residential hotel was designed in Georgian Revival style with warm buff limestone, Tapestry Brick and clay-based ceramic terracotta being the main components to the exterior. The Wade Park Manor structure was fire-proof, with it’s frame made of steel and reinforced concrete.

The interiors were palace-like, utilizing only the finest materials from around the world, and included a grand lobby with an 18-foot ceiling and paneled oak and marble walls, two dining rooms and a ballroom and banquet room with dinner seating for 250 and room for 400 for balls and concerts. Of the 400 guest rooms, 40 were spacious single rooms, with the remaining rooms divided into two to six room suites. Being mere footsteps from Wade Park and the Cleveland Art Museum– the rooms offered spectacular views of the city.

Today, The Wade Park Manor operates as an upscale retirement community, under the name of Judson Manor. Photography of the building’s interior spaces was not allowed.

All photographs, except where noted, were taken on March 9, 2016.


“…East 55th and Euclid Avenue was real… precious…”


 
“Precious” – Pretenders (1980)

The intersection of East 55th Street and Euclid Avenue, in Cleveland, appears to the daily passer-by as the average, run-of-the-mill busy city intersection. But like many things in life–there is so much more than what initially “meets the eye.”

In 1852, the The Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad line (which eventually became The Pennsylvania Railroad) was built, connecting Cleveland and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The line crossed Cleveland’s grand Euclid Avenue at what was at that time the city’s eastern most “developed” area– the north/south road known as Willson Street. In 1906, when the city adopted a numerical system for north/south city streets, Willson Street would become East 55th Street.

During the building of the railroad through Cleveland, Jared V. Willson, the property owner of the land where tracks were to cross Euclid Avenue, saw the likelihood of an economic windfall, and negotiated the building of the first train station at the site.

On April 28th, only thirteen years later, a train making its way to Springfield, Illinois made a Cleveland stop and the flag draped casket of President Abraham Lincoln was solemnly unloaded at the station and placed on a horse drawn hearse. Heading west on Euclid Avenue, the procession made its way to Public Square, where the only outdoor public viewing of the dead President took place, among the stops that were made on the long journey home.

In July of 1881, The Euclid Avenue Station was once again utilized as the Cleveland train stop to unload the casket and allow for the public mourning of another President. James A. Garfield, “Cleveland’s President,” like Lincoln, made the same slow, venerable trip up Euclid Avenue from the station, to Public Square.

From the same vantage point as the picture above, a photograph taken in the early 1900’s showing the Pennsylvania Railroad Euclid Avenue Station at East 55th Street. Photographer unknown. Courtesy of the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery Collection.

During the later-half of the 1800’s, as the city grew eastward toward the University Circle area, the Euclid Avenue Train Station contributed to a massive, ever increasing traffic problem at the intersection of Euclid Avenue and Willson Street. The combination of horse drawn, and eventually motorized vehicles, electric street cars, and train tracks that crossed both thoroughfares at the intersection made Euclid and Willson one of most congested, and dangerous cross streets in the country. It was partially because of this situation that the tracks were reconstructed and run above street level in 1912. With this improvement, The Pennsylvania Railroad Company built a new, independent passenger station to accommodate the new alignment. Steel girder bridges and supports were used all throughout the heavy industrial areas to the North and South of Euclid Avenue along the newly raised Pennsylvania Railroad line in Cleveland.


 
The passenger station was closed in 1965 and it’s entrance-ways were bricked-up. Today you would never know that a heavily used, historic train station ever existed at this spot for over 100 years. But remnants of the turn-of-the-century station are still there– hidden secrets of the past, behind the brick.
 












A photo taken in 1939 of westbound Euclid Avenue traffic under the Pennsylvania Railroad overpass at East 55th Street. Photo courtesy the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery Collection.

The last four photos below were taken February 22, 2016 at the Cleveland Greenhouse. Exterior decor from the Euclid Avenue Train Station, preserved and on display.





 

Photos (unless otherwise noted) taken July 21, 2015


“You had your time, you had the power…”
























































“Radio Ga Ga” – Queen (1984)

(55 photos)

At the corner of Cedar Ave. and Ashland Avenue, on Cleveland’s east side, sits a relic– today in defiance to the demolition wrecking ball — a remnant of Cleveland’s booming industrial past.

Created to power the electric rail streetcars of the day, the Cedar Avenue powerhouse of the Cleveland Electric Railway Company was opened on December 18, 1888, as perhaps the most modern, state of the art facilities of it’s kind.

Long since closed, gutted and used as a make-shift storage area, after being sold, traded, handed down, through the years–and finally abandoned, like so many old buildings…  The building seems structurally sound–it’s interiors, a labyrinth of passageways and tunnels– and left behind pieces of history. Detailed information and photos of the massive interiors showing the generators and other equipment as it looked in it’s hey-day were recorded in an article in the April 1, 1902 edition of The Engineer, entitled “The Evolution of Electric Railway Power Plant Apparatus, as Illustrated by the Cedar Avenue Station of the Cleveland Electric Railway Co.” (link to article).

Photos taken June 29, August 5, and  October 27, 2015


“…Heaven holds a place for those who pray…”























“Mrs. Robinson” – Simon & Garfunkel (1968)
“Mrs. Robinson” – The Lemonheads (1993)

(23 Photos)

This stunning building, located at Euclid Avenue and East 82nd Street– today the Liberty Hill Baptist Church, was built in 1912, originally as The Euclid Avenue Temple for the Anshe Chesed German Orthodox Jewish congregation, today the oldest Jewish congregation in Cleveland.

Designed by the Cleveland architectural firm, Lehman and Schmitt in Neoclassical style, the synagogue featured a symmetrical plan with a semicircular 1,400 capacity auditorium.  It also was adorned with beautiful stained glass windows designed by Louis Tiffany.

Following World War II, as members of the growing Jewish congregation began establishing residence in the eastern suburbs–the need for a larger Temple facility, more convenient to the eastern suburbs became apparent. Also growing at the time in the Fairfax neighborhood surrounding The Euclid Avenue Temple was Cleveland’s African-American Baptist population.

Eventually a site on Fairmount Boulevard in the eastern suburb of Beachwood was selected, and in May of 1957, the new Fairmount Temple was dedicated and the Euclid Avenue Temple was sold to Liberty Hill Baptist Church.

Photos taken August 27, 2015


“One, two, three, four…”

“1234” – Feist (2007)

The W. Bingham Hardware Company Warehouse Building
Built: 1915
Architect: Walker and Weeks
Today: “The Bingham” (luxury apartments)
1278 West 9th Street
Warehouse District
Downtown
Cleveland, OH

Photo taken May 21, 2015


“Along the river of men…”


















“River of Men” – Tom Waits (1998)

(18 Photographs)

During the Industrial Revolution of the mid and late 1800’s, up and down Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River, heavy industry flourished and was responsible for the growth of the city– from a small village to a major metropolis, by the end of the 19th century.

John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company was chief among the Cleveland based companies that utilized the river as a transportation solution, distributing across the nation, product from its Cleveland oil refineries. Resulting from the new technologies derived by the Standard Oil Company, chemical companies began populating the area in abundance.

In 1871, three enterprising men of the time– Henry A. Sherwin, Alanson T. Osborn, and Edward P. Williams formed a partnership and created Sherwin, Williams, & Company, a paint manufacturing and retail company, headquartered in a long-since-demolished building on Cleveland’s Superior Street, in an area today known as Public Square. Taking advantage of the rich, local chemical availability, the firm became one of the first in the country to concentrate on producing ready-mixed paint and lacquers for retail consumption.

In 1874, the group purchased from J. D. Rockefeller, the Standard Oil cooperage building, which produced the wooden barrels that the company used at the time to transport Standard Oil’s refined oil products that were “barreling” out of Cleveland to a nation thirsty with consumption.

Once the transaction was complete, and the necessary equipment and materials were moved in, the building (pictured above), along the Cuyahoga River, at 601 Canal Street, became the manufacturing home of the Sherwin-Williams Company, producing paste paints, oil colors, and putty.

The company greatly flourished over the years, opening plants all across the nation. Today, a national brand, with headquarters still in Cleveland, and thousands of retail stores nationwide– the old “cooperage building”– The original Sherwin-Williams paint factory, remained opened and in production until 1982.

Photos taken July 29, 2015


“She thinks she missed the train to Mars… she’s out back counting stars….”























“Stars” – HUM (1995)

(22 Photos)

Hiding in amongst the trees at the top of the Taylor Road hill in East Cleveland– The abandoned Warner and Swasey Observatory, just four miles southeast of its original parent home, the then, Case School of Applied Science (Case-Western Reserve University.)

The Observatory was designed in 1918 by the Cleveland architectural firm of Walker and Weeks and The Warner & Swasey Company  completed construction of the building in 1920.   On October 12th of that year, world renowned astronomer Dr. W. W. Campbell, the Director of the University of California Lick Observatory, gave the key note address at the observatory’s dedication.

The building included a small library, a darkroom, a transit room, an office and one bedroom. The observatory also housed two Riefler astronomical regulator clocks, two four-inch transits, and an extremely sensitive zenith 9.5-inch refractor telescope, built by the Warner and Swasey Company of Cleveland. The entire Observatory, including all equipment, as well as the cost of construction of the physical structure, was donated to the Case Institute of Technology by Trustees Worcester R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey, of the Warner and Swasey Company.

As the need for expansion of facilities and new equipment became evident, additions to the Observatory were graciously provided by Warner and Swasey. In 1940, the building of en entire new wing to the Observatory was completed. Included in this expansion was a new library, a teaching lecture hall, and a new Warner & Swasey Company-manufactured 24-inch Burrell Schmidt telescope, housed in a new dome (pictured below.)

By the 1950’s, city-light evening sky “noise” made it necessary for Case to develop a new facility and relocate the housed telescopes and other equipment, in order for the school to maintain the highest levels of scientific integrity.  The new facility– the Nassau Astronomical Station, was built in 1957 on 281 acres of land in Montville Township in Geauga County, thirty miles to the east of the Warner and Swasey Observatory. The Burrell Schmidt telescope was transferred to this site, and was replaced with a 36-inch telescope that was used primarily for viewing by the public. In 1980, The Warner and Swasey Observatory was closed permanently, and the original zenith telescope was transferred to the Euclid Avenue main campus of Case-Western Reserve University, where today it is housed and in-use in the University’s Albert W. Smith Building.

The old observatory was sold and has changed ownership hands a few different times since Case managed the facility, and although every attempt has been made to board-up entrance points inside… graffiti artists, area gangs, historians, photographers and urban explorers have all found their way to the interior of the building. Picture number 20, from the top, of the photos I have taken and posted here– the empty window frame– was my magic doorway into the fascinating storied past of the Warner and Swasey Observatory that still stands at the top of a hill in East Cleveland.

Above photos taken July 3, 2015

The 24-inch Burrell Schmidt telescope manufactured by the Warner & Swasey Company, pictured here at the Warner and Swasey Observatory. Photo courtesy of the Cleveland Memory Project and the Michael Schwartz Library at Cleveland State University.


“…where no one asks any questions… or looks too long in your face…”

“Darkness at the Edge of Town” – Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band (1978)

On the west bank of the Cuyahoga River– A building on Scranton Road in the industrial Flats of Cleveland, Ohio.

Photo taken May 21, 2015


“…As we journey here below… on a pilgrimage of woe…”












































“Pleyel’s Hymn” – Master Mason Degree Dirge, Masonic Hymn, recorded 1909

-48 photos-

In 1916, architect William J. Carter was awarded the bid to design and build The Newburgh Masonic Temple, at 8910 Miles Park Avenue, in Cleveland’s south east Union-Miles neighborhood. The project was completed in one year, and the first meeting of the Freemasons took place in the new 3-story building on May 31, 1917.

Due to increasing maintenance and repair costs, The Newburgh Masonic Temple was put up for sale in 1969 and eventually merged with a neighboring Order in Brecksville, Ohio.

The visit to capture these images, inside this dilapidated grand structure was emotional– seeing the once elegant, giant ballrooms and ritual rooms reduced to broken pieces of rubble– natural erosion and vandalism… Much of the interior areas were pitch black in darkness. Spine tingling. The secret rituals from centuries before, practiced through the generations within these walls… Freemason symbols, the secret passage-ways, the tucked-away rooms. THIS building.. its structural integrity– its history… seems to warrant more than it has been left for, almost 100 years later.

Photos taken June 22, 2015


“It was the heat of the moment…”


















“Heat of the Moment” – ASIA (1982)

(19 Photos)
In an area on Cleveland’s east side that was once filled with heavy industry and commerce, today only hints of that glorious history still exist in the shadows. At the corner of Central Avenue and East 67th street one such structure-as evidence, holds on by a string.

The Cleveland Co-Operative Stove Company was established at this site in the late 1800’s and eventually expanded it’s operations to several other manufacturing locations nationally. The company produced an extensive line of large, highly ornate, coal-burning cook stoves, ranges and heaters. In 1909, as technology provided, a full line of gas ranges was introduced by the company.

From the top: Photos 1, 10, 15 and 18 taken April 27, 2015. Photos 2 – 9, 11 – 14, 16, and 17 taken May 1, 2015

The above advertisement appeared in the July 1895 issue of “Stoves and Hardware Reporter”


“…and your stone walls turn my blood a little cold.”












“San Quentin” – Johnny Cash (live 1969)

[12 photos]

Eerily serene, especially during a fast approaching nightfall– Squire’s Castle sits nestled in the North Chagrin Reservation of the Cleveland Metroparks, in Willoughby Hills, Ohio. Built in the 1890’s by Feargus B. Squire, an executive with Cleveland based Standard Oil Company, the structure was originally intended to be a “gatekeepers” house for a country home estate for Squire and his family. The home was never built, and the Squires utilized the “castle” as a weekend retreat. The building included several bedrooms and living areas, a kitchen, dining room, breakfast porch and a library. It’s interiors boasted finely plastered walls, leaded glass windows, and beautifully detailed woodwork.

Squire sold the dwelling in 1922 and in 1925 the land and structure was sold to the Cleveland Metroparks. Over the years the interiors have been gutted and all that remain are the castle ruins. Legend has it that Squire’s Castle and it’s land are haunted by the ghost of the wife of Feargus Squire, Rebecca, who died at a very young age, in 1929.

Photos taken December 26, 2014


“…oh, there’s more to life than books, you know… but not much more.. not much more…”




“Handsome Devil” – THE SMITHS (1983)

For over 100 years, this Italianate Style antebellum home has been more than just a “page” in Cleveland’s written history. The ornately detailed house was built in 1838 for early Cleveland settler George Merwin. After changing owners a few different times after Mr. Merwin’s death, the house became the headquarters and library for a very exclusive private gentleman’s club in 1892. This organization, The Rowfant Club, is still in existence today at this location on Prospect Avenue near East 30th Street.

Dedicated to “primarily the critical study of books in their various capacities to please the mind of man…”, the “by-invitation-only” bibliophile aficionado membership of the Rowfant Club has convened at the Merwin House over the decades for meetings, ceremonies, lectures, or just to simply relax with one of the books from the club’s extensive in-house private library collection. Members of note have included James Ford Rhodes, Charles F. Schweinfurth, and William G. Mather.

Top 3 photos taken November 25, 2014
Bottom 2 photos taken June 16, 2014


“…you’ll see a smilin’ face… a fireplace.. a cozy room… a little nest that’s nestled where the roses bloom…”









“My Blue Heaven” – Frank Sinatra (1950)

[10 Photos]

A very unassuming, almost hidden piece of urban property at 4806 Euclid Avenue in midtown Cleveland…

Built in 1898 as an extended-stay housing option for visiting business executives from other cities, “The Esmond” also served as the ideal turn-of-the century “swanky” bachelor pad for single businessmen working in the hustle-bustle world that was Cleveland, Ohio in the early 1900’s.

The building was designed by architect John Eisenmann, who also co-designed with fellow architect, George H. Smith, the Cleveland Arcade. Eisenmann is also credited with designing the official flag of the State of Ohio that flies today in the buckeye state (and He was a graduate of the University of Michigan, of all things!)

Through the years The Esmond has continued to serve as a fashionable apartment building, and still offers extended-stay bed and breakfast suites to visitors to the city.

Photos taken October 31, 2014


“Two heads together… are better than one in rainy or sunny weather…”

“Two Hearts Are Better Than One” – Frank Sinatra (1946)

The outer wall of an abandoned building where E. 120th Street dead-ends at Coltman Street, in the far eastern recesses of Cleveland’s Little Italy neighborhood. I have no idea the “who” or the “why” of the two faces that have been painted onto this building… but they caught my eye. Urban street art… there doesn’t have to be a rhyme or reason!

Photo taken September 9, 2014


“…and the walls kept tumbling down in the city that we love…”





















“Pompeii” – Bastille (2013)
[21 photographs]

Left for dead. That’s what it seemed like– this old industrial plant, built in 1922. I ventured in one afternoon not knowing what I would find beyond the sight-lines that the broken out windows at street level afforded me on a previous visit, a few weeks earlier. One of my many lunch time adventures, clad in dress pants, shirt and tie… polished dress shoes… exploring a long since abandoned factory in a desolate part of town that people tell me I shouldn’t venture into. But I really do live for these places. My camera and I (eye.)

Located on Ashland Road, somewhere between Cedar and Central Avenues, on Cleveland’s east side, the six-story structure was built by Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, as an additional piece to their, then, existing complex of factory buildings lining Ashland Road. Numerous subsidiaries of Westinghouse as well as other separately owned corporations utilized this brick and mortar facility over the years. During World War II activity soared to peak production at the site when the Thompson Aircraft Products Company (Tapco) called the facility home and military aircraft parts were produced to sustain America’s air superiority against the Axis Powers. A series of other manufacturing tenants followed after the war. It is unclear as to the exact date, but some time at the end of the 1970’s the premises were vacated for the last time and the building was foreclosed.

Over the years following it’s closing, like so many others of it’s kind– the Westinghouse factory building was torn and frayed by vandals and vagrants and “urban artists.” As pictured above, a total ruination of a once proud building— stripped of everything that could be taken and used as an illegal dumping ground. It looks as if some formal wrecking has taken place as well. But in spite of all the crumbling and blight that has taken place– My imagination, as I investigated the wreckage that has evolved, was not hindered. A rigorous past… men and women who earned their days wages… churning machinery. Turn of the century electrical innovations… American war planes flying over Nazi Germany, housed with Cleveland made high-altitude fuel systems. All of this and more hidden within the fractured remnants of this place on Ashland Road on Cleveland’s east side.

Photos taken July 3 and August 8, 2014


“…I think I’m in trouble…”

In a window along the exterior wall of Cleveland’s famed Tee Shirt printing shop, Daffy Dan’s. Located at 2101 Superior Avenue, near Cleveland State University, in downtown, DD’s has been custom screen printing tee shirts since 1973. Since then, according to Daffy Dan: “If your t-shirt doesn’t have DD on the sleeve, it’s just underwear!”

A picture of me back in college, sporting a Daffy Dan’s WMMS 101 FM Home of the Buzzard t-shirt:

“Trouble” – Lindsey Buckingham (1981)


“Avé María, grátia pléna…”







“Ave Maria” – Dolores O’Riordan and Luciano Pavarotti (live, 1996)

St. Mary Seminary and Graduate School of Theology

This 200 room seminary was built in 1924 on an 11-acre site on Ansel Avenue in the Cleveland east side, St. Clair-Superior neighborhood. The facility included private living quarters for 150 students and professors as well as classrooms, a large dining room and kitchen, a library, gymnasium, several lounges and a Chapel. The building was designed by architect Franz Werner in Spanish Mission Style.

Today the beautiful confines are home to the Hitchcock Center for Woman, a substance abuse treatment center and Half-way house for woman, infants and children up to the age of ten.

Photos taken August 8, 2014


“This kids not alright…”

“THISKIDSNOTALRIGHT” – Awolnation (2013)

[13 Photos]

On East 22nd Street, between Central and Cedar Avenues, in downtown Cleveland: the former Cuyahoga County Juvenile Court and Detention Center building. Completed in 1932, it was considered to be the finest model for such a legal institution in the country. The court moved to updated facilities in 2011 and the building, a city landmark, has been put up for sale. Hopefully it will be utilized again, preserving the historical relevance and beautiful details of this building.

Photos taken June 3, 2014


“…it’s to a castle I will take you… where what’s to be, they say will be…”

“What Is and What Should Never Be” – Led Zeppelin (1969)

[11 Photographs]

At 10660 Carnegie Avenue, in Cleveland’s University Circle neighborhood, the Tudor Arms Hotel building marks the sky with castle-like elegance, and has served the community in vastly different ways over the years of it’s existence.

The building opened it’s doors originally in 1933, as The Cleveland Club, an exclusive, members-only, place where Cleveland’s upper-crust met for lavish parties and other extracurricular activities.

The 12-story, Tudor Revival-style building was designed by American Civil War veteran, and MIT graduate, residential architect Frank B. Meade. Included amenities that attracted Cleveland area socialites to the Cleveland Club– a bowling alley, two swimming pools, a squash court, and two majestically detailed ballrooms.

A victim of the Great Depression of the 1930’s, the club eventually closed and The Tudor Arms Hotel took over the beautiful confines in 1939. During the 1940’s, the Tudor Arms Hotel became known for it’s dinner and jazz shows that filled it’s main ballroom– The Empress Room, on a nightly basis. The hotel offered 157 leaded-glass window, elegantly detailed suites. The hotel corridors lavished beautifully molded plaster and carved stone decor to the visiting guest’s experience.

Case Western Reserve University, eventually took over management of the Hotel as hotel business declined, and the building was slowly converted to a graduate student residence hall in the late 1950’s. By 1963, a total conversion had taken place. In later years, the building was leased to the federally funded Cleveland Job Corps.

Today, the building is home to DoubleTree by Hilton – The Tudor Arms Hotel, as well as two fine restaurants, and offers an exquisite over-night option for visitors to the nearby main campuses of the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, and other institutions in walking distance around the University Circle area.

First 10 photos taken May 16, 2014
Bottom photo taken April 19, 2014


“You’ll wind up in some factory that’s full-time filth and nowhere left to go…”














“Don’t Go Back to Rockville” – REM (1984)

A collection of 17 photos I took of the historic Warner & Swasey Company factory building located at 5701 Carnegie Avenue near E. 55th Street, on Cleveland’s east side. I snuck into the old building on my lunch hour one day and climbed to the top in amazement.

The factory was built in 1881 and was the fruition of owners Worcester P. Warner and Ambrose Swasey. The factory produced turret lathes, but was more famous for it’s precision astronomical telescopes and other optical instruments.

In 1886, the largest telescope in the world, at that time, was created at this site for the Lick Observatory in California. Other Warney and Swasey telescopes were produced for the United States Naval Observatory, the McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin, the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, in Canada, and the Yerkes Observatory in Wisconsin, to name just a few.

Because the turret lathes were far more profitable to make, this is what the company concentrated on in the 20th Century. By World War II, employing over 7,000 people, over half of all such lathes produced in the United States were manufactured in Cleveland by Warner and Swasey.

The beautiful structure has been ransacked over the years following it’s closure in 1983. The walk through to the top was fascinating, knowing the work that had been done there, and the age of the structure. The city is going through a 3 Million Dollar remediation project funded by the Federal Government to clean up and restore the old Warner & Swasey factory, but these days, from the evidence that I saw, not much has been done (or even started.) Eventually it is hoped that the facility can be refurbished into new offices, labs, and warehouse space and play a vital role in the continual development of Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor.

Interior photographs taken May 13, 2014
Exterior facade photographs taken May 21, 2014


“Well all the people have got their problems… that ain’t nothing new…. with the help of the Good Lord we can all pull on through…”

“It Ain’t Easy” – David Bowie (1972)

One of the front entrances to St. Vitas Roman Catholic Church, located at East 61st Street and Glass Avenue, near St. Clair Avenue, on Cleveland’s north east side.

St. Vitas was built in 1932 at a cost of $350,000 and today is the largest Slovenian Church in the United States of America.


“…them smokestacks reachin’ like the arms of God… into a beautiful sky…”

“Youngstown” – Bruce Springsteen (1995)

Old factories and warehouses can be some of the most interesting landscapes to capture on camera. Towering smokestacks jetting into the sky add to the whole mystique of these buildings. Across the city of Cleveland are dozens of these relics. These are a few of my favorites.

Top photo: The abandoned Joseph and Feiss Company Warehouse, built in 1921. Photo taken November 4, 2013.

Middle photo: Abandoned warehouse at East 49th Street and Lakeside Avenue. Photo taken October 28, 2013.

Bottom Photo: Built in 1892 – The Power House, created to provide electricity for the streetcars run by the Woodland & West Side Street Railway Company. Located on the west bank of the Cuyahoga River, in the flats. Today the building is home to the Cleveland Aquarium. Photo taken March 28, 2013


“They say that the left side of the brain controls the right… they say that the right side has to work hard all night… maybe I think too much for my own good…”

“Think Too Much” – Paul Simon (1983)

The Rockefeller Physics Building on the campus of Case-Western Reserve University on Cleveland’s east side.

The Italian Renaissance style building was constructed in 1905 at a cost of $96,042.22. The building which bears his name, was built through a gift to the University by John D. Rockefeller.

Photo taken April 19, 2014


“…and all I do is pour… black coffee… since the blues caught my eye…”

“Black Coffee” – Peggy Lee (1953)

And for comparison purposes, the last picture in this 4 picture set– taken by an unnamed photographer in the early 1950’s (courtesy of The Chesler Group.)

At the northwest corner of Detroit Avenue and West 29th Street, on Cleveland’s near-west side, sits a refurbished relic from days gone by… Originally built in 1895 to house the Cleveland Steel Range Company, and later a different company that produced pistons for automobiles and airplane engines, the Van Rooy Coffee Company purchased and moved into the Romanesque-Revival style industrial building in 1935. The company provided “Hotel Quality” roasted Arabica coffee beans from Brazil and around the world as well as teas and spices from The Orient, and quickly developed a “second-to-none” reputation for the highest quality of products. The Van Rooy Coffee Company, still in operation, moved from this building in 2003, to a site just outside Cleveland. The old Van Rooy Building is listed both on the National Register of Historic Places and the Cleveland Landmark Registry.

First three photos taken April 8, 2014


“Looking around the house… hidden behind the window and the door… searching for signs of life but there’s nobody home…”

“Good” – Better than Ezra (1995)

The two-story, red-bricked Italianate, Jeremiah Ensworth House, built in 1870, is one of the many fascinating buildings that still exist along Cleveland’s Prospect Avenue. The house was built as Ensworth’s residence upon his return to Cleveland, following his service as Captain in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The beautiful structure is listed on National Register of Historic Places

To the right of the house, another historically significant structure, also listed on the Register: The Plaza Apartments. Built in 1901.

Photo taken January 10, 2014


“…’Cause we find ourselves in the same old mess… singin’ drunken lullabies.”

“Drunken Lullabies” – Flogging Molly (2002)

(two photographs: front entrance, and rear patio area)

I was lucky enough to bring in the new year, 2012, at this fantastic Irish Pub– called, “The Treehouse,” but never a St. Patty’s Day… not yet at least!

Located in the heart of Cleveland’s Tremont neighborhood, at the northeast corner of Professor and College Avenues, the original structure was completed in 1900. After a variety of different uses over the years, the Treehouse opened for business in 1996 and has been a “must do” entertainment spot along Professor, ever since.

Inside the Jameson and Guinness flow and the crowd arrives nightly. The sizable bar service area is Canopied by a huge tree, with branches extending out over nearly the whole bar area.

I am thinking a pint of Guinness Stout after work today may be in order! Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Photos taken January 4, 2014


“Pretty women out walking with gorillas down my street… from my window I’m staring while my coffee grows cold…”

“Is She Really Going Out With Him?” – Joe Jackson (1978)

On the southeast corner of W. 3rd Street and Lakeside Avenue, in the Warehouse District of Downtown Cleveland.

Photo taken October 10, 2013


“But falling over you… is the news of the day.”

“The Ghost in You” – The Psychedelic Furs (1984)

At 1017 Fairfield Avenue in Cleveland’s near-west side Tremont neighborhood, the building that once housed the city’s first daily Polish Newspaper, Wiadomosci Codzienne.

Photo taken February 4, 2014


“Living on a lighted stage approaches the unreal… for those who think and feel…”

“Limelight” – RUSH (1981)

A mural on the west-facing wall of the historic Karamu House theater at E. 89th Street, in Cleveland’s east side Fairfax neighborhood. The person depicted in the mural is famed alumnus of the Karamu House, actress Ruby Dee. The 40-by-36-foot mural was completed in July of 2013 by nationally acclaimed muralist Kent Twitchell, with help from several local artists and volunteers.

Photo taken January 31, 2014.


“I can’t stop smiling long enough to pretend to sympathize…”

“I Can’t Stop Smiling” – Velocity Girl (1994)

(3 photos) At the southwest corner of East 36th Street and Superior Avenue sits The Tavern Club Building, built in 1904. The Tavern Club, which was established in 1892-93, was a “Gentleman’s Club” for distinguished Cleveland “movers and shakers” of the time. Today the Tudor-style structure still operates as an upscale night club and restaurant.

Photos taken January 10, 2014


“Hey you, up in the sky… Learning to fly… tell me how high do you think you’ll go…”

“Up in the Sky” – Noel Gallagher (OASIS, acoustic 1994)

(2 photos)

Lucky’s Cafe
777 Starkweather Avenue
Tremont Neighborhood
Near west side – Cleveland, Ohio

Photos taken December 11, 2013


“…with her line blown out she’s hummin’ like a turbojet… propped her up in the backyard on concrete blocks for a new clutch plate and a new set of shocks…”

“Open All Night” – Bruce Springsteen (1982)

Cleveland Packard Building
Built in 1915
Classical Revival Architectural Style
Located at 5100-5206 Prospect Avenue, in Cleveland, Ohio
Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984

The building served as Cleveland’s Packard Automobile Dealership from 1915 to 1939.

Photo taken October 28, 2013


“…and if I had a dollar bill for all the things I’ve done, there’d be a mountain of money piled up to my chin…”

“Missionary Man” – Eurythmics (1986)

An old, rather odd shaped bank building, on Detroit Avenue in the Gordon Square Arts District west side neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio.

Photo taken June 9, 2013


Ohio bricks, olive oil and vinegar…

Ohio bricks, olive oil and vinegar...

Inside “The Olive Scene”
19132 Old Detroit Rd
Rocky River, OH

Photo taken June 5, 2012


“Well, show me the way… to the next whiskey bar”

“Alabama Song” – The Doors (1966)

Inside the Opryland Hotel
2800 Opryland Dr.
Nashville, Tennessee

Photo taken June 27, 2003