elegance

“…you’re ageless, timeless, lace and fineness… you’re beauty and elegance…”


















 

“You’re In My Heart” – Rod Stewart (1977)

The Cleveland Carnegie West Library is one of the over 2,500 public libraries that were built around the world with grant funds from industrial giant and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It is among 104 Carnegie built public libraries in Ohio, and one of 14 in Cleveland. The very first Carnegie Library was opened in 1883 in the city of Dunfermline, Scotland, where Andrew Carnegie was born.

The Carnegie West Library was built at 1900 Fulton Road in Cleveland’s near-westside neighborhood of Ohio City in 1910. It was designed in a Modified Renaissance architectural style with elements of Classical style. Chosen to design the building was Edward Lippincott Tilton, a New York Architect, who designed over 100 libraries in the United States and Canada over the span of his career. The outer construction materials consist of brick, limestone and terra cotta.

Today, the Official Designated Cleveland Landmark– Carnegie West Library, at 25,000 square feet in size, is the largest branch in the Cleveland Public Library system. In 1979 the Library was completely renovated and restored after many years of deterioration. The terra cotta columns and ornate trim were restored utilizing a special epoxy injection and coating technique which saved the, in some cases, cracked and crumbling exterior to it’s beautiful original condition. The American Institute of Architects recognized the restoration project with their prestigious Preservation and Design Award.

Monochrome photos taken April 8, 2016
Color photos taken May 10, 2016


“I’m working so hard… to keep you in the luxury…”



















Back when the Wade Park Manor was new–A photo taken from roughly the same perspective as the photo above. Photo courtesy of http://www.judsonsmartliving.org/judson-manor/


A postcard from the 1930’s — an artistic rendering of Wade Park Manor, with Wade Park in the foreground.


“Luxury” – The Rolling Stones (1974)

(21 Photos)

Elaborate parties, and the inter-mingling of local artists, musicians, business giants and top-national performing acts– all either stayed here as visitors or lived here as residents, and all were treated to only the best during their stay. It was the high-life in the roaring Twenties.

And it was in 1923, in the area today known as University Circle, that the lavish Wade Park Manor residential hotel was opened.

George A. Schneider, the former developer/manager of The Cleveland Athletic Club, took the reigns of the Wade Park Project and decided on the New York architectural firm of George Post & Sons, who had a Cleveland office, to design the building. Among the Cleveland projects that the firm was responsible for, The Cleveland Trust Building (1908) at East 9th Street and Euclid Avenue is most notable.

The 11-story, 400 room residential hotel was designed in Georgian Revival style with warm buff limestone, Tapestry Brick and clay-based ceramic terracotta being the main components to the exterior. The Wade Park Manor structure was fire-proof, with it’s frame made of steel and reinforced concrete.

The interiors were palace-like, utilizing only the finest materials from around the world, and included a grand lobby with an 18-foot ceiling and paneled oak and marble walls, two dining rooms and a ballroom and banquet room with dinner seating for 250 and room for 400 for balls and concerts. Of the 400 guest rooms, 40 were spacious single rooms, with the remaining rooms divided into two to six room suites. Being mere footsteps from Wade Park and the Cleveland Art Museum– the rooms offered spectacular views of the city.

Today, The Wade Park Manor operates as an upscale retirement community, under the name of Judson Manor. Photography of the building’s interior spaces was not allowed.

All photographs, except where noted, were taken on March 9, 2016.


“…he’s a well-respected man about town doing the best things so conservatively…”









“A Well Respected Man” – The Kinks (1965)

United States Presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, William McKinley and William Howard Taft all were members here. Six U.S Senators and two U.S. Supreme Court Justices enjoyed membership as well.

Located on the northeast corner of East 12th Street and Euclid Avenue, in downtown Cleveland,The Union Club of Cleveland has been an exclusive, “by invitation only” political, cultural, and civic iconic force in Cleveland, since the club was established in 1872, and ultimately was to become the most prestigious, and influential club in the city.

The building shown here was designed and built by famed Cleveland architect, and Union Club member, Charles Frederick Schweinfurth. This new building for the Union Club’s expanding membership was completed in 1905. It was built of locally mined Berea Sandstone, with it’s outer walls, in places exceeding 3 feet in thickness. Schweinfurth noted that as the building aged, the sandstone would take-on a darkened, aesthetically pleasing look. And it was lauded immediately by visitors for it’s elegance and refined Classical architectural design. The majestic interior is adorned with a grand Italian marble staircase, Persian rugs, and a master dining room that boasts 20-foot high ornate plaster ceilings, ornamental columns and rich honey-colored hardwood floors.

Photos taken March 4, 2016


“…Heaven holds a place for those who pray…”























“Mrs. Robinson” – Simon & Garfunkel (1968)
“Mrs. Robinson” – The Lemonheads (1993)

(23 Photos)

This stunning building, located at Euclid Avenue and East 82nd Street– today the Liberty Hill Baptist Church, was built in 1912, originally as The Euclid Avenue Temple for the Anshe Chesed German Orthodox Jewish congregation, today the oldest Jewish congregation in Cleveland.

Designed by the Cleveland architectural firm, Lehman and Schmitt in Neoclassical style, the synagogue featured a symmetrical plan with a semicircular 1,400 capacity auditorium.  It also was adorned with beautiful stained glass windows designed by Louis Tiffany.

Following World War II, as members of the growing Jewish congregation began establishing residence in the eastern suburbs–the need for a larger Temple facility, more convenient to the eastern suburbs became apparent. Also growing at the time in the Fairfax neighborhood surrounding The Euclid Avenue Temple was Cleveland’s African-American Baptist population.

Eventually a site on Fairmount Boulevard in the eastern suburb of Beachwood was selected, and in May of 1957, the new Fairmount Temple was dedicated and the Euclid Avenue Temple was sold to Liberty Hill Baptist Church.

Photos taken August 27, 2015


“…The blacksmith and the artist reflect it in their art… forge their creativity… closer to the heart…”














“Closer to the Heart” – Rush (1977)

When a business stays vibrant and prosperous for over 100 years– especially in a competitive, Capitalist Free Market system, it speaks volumes about the highest standards of quality, dedication, and perseverance that that company undoubtedly has had to maintain over the course of time.

One such company, The Rose Iron Works, located at 1536 East 43rd Street, between Payne and Superior Avenues in Cleveland, has been established at this address since 1911 and along the way has successfully made an outstanding name for itself as a maker of the finest decorative metal works available anywhere in the world.

Founded by Hungarian-born, American immigrant, and master craftsman blacksmith Martin Rose– the Rose Iron Works has been a family owned and operated business since it’s inception in 1904. Martin Rose chose Cleveland to embark into the new world with his family, for the city’s international reputation as a standard bearer in steel production and metalworking. He also believed in Cleveland’s promise of greater opportunity for him and his family.

Over the years the firm has catered to those desiring customized, ornate wrought iron and stainless steel decor. The best residential and commercial architects of the time during the company’s development, all sought The Rose Iron Works “touch,” to add further distinction to their architectural building projects including Walker and Weeks, and Charles Schweinfurth, (highlighted regularly in this blog.)

Today, the heritage, artistry and direction of the Rose Iron Works is in the hands of grandson, Bob Rose.  And like his father, uncles and grandfather, before him, the company continues to offer only the finest one-of-a-kind, custom-made forged metal creations.

Photos taken August 27, 2015


“One, two, three, four…”

“1234” – Feist (2007)

The W. Bingham Hardware Company Warehouse Building
Built: 1915
Architect: Walker and Weeks
Today: “The Bingham” (luxury apartments)
1278 West 9th Street
Warehouse District
Downtown
Cleveland, OH

Photo taken May 21, 2015


“Things are different today, I hear every mother say… cooking fresh food for her husband’s just a drag… so she buys an instant cake and she burns her frozen steak…”



“Mother’s Little Helper” – The Rolling Stones (1966)

The two entrance ways into the once– supermarket giant “Fisher Brothers” Bakery and Warehouse, built in 1916, at 2323 Lakeside Avenue in Cleveland.

Incorporated in Cleveland in 1908, by brothers Manning and Charles Fisher, the food retail company grew handily with sales reaching over $18 million and over 300 food stores in Northern Ohio, by 1928.

In 1961, the name of the company was changed to Fisher Foods, Inc.  During the years prior to this, Fisher Brothers had become the largest retail food distributor in Cleveland. But by 1965, the company only held 12 percent of the Cleveland market. In that year the fledgling firm merged with Fazio’s and Costa supermarkets, who were prospering as part of the Stop-N-Shop Super Markets Association.

Although Fisher Foods maintained solvency and in some cases, prosperity throughout the 1970’s and 80’s under a variety of different marketing names and outlets, in 1997 all of Fisher Foods financial holdings were sold to the Pittsburgh-based Giant Eagle Supermarkets for $403 million.

Today the 420,000 square foot Fisher Brothers building, with it’s elegant entrance ways on Lakeside Avenue, is leased as loft-style commercial warehouse space.

Top photo taken March 24, 2014
Middle and bottom photos taken June 16, 2015


“…operating, generating… new life, new life…”







“New Life” – Depeche Mode (1981)

Built in 1919, The United Auto Company Building was one of the structures that added to Prospect Avenue, on Cleveland’s near-east side, being known as the city’s “Automobile Row” during the early 20th Century. It served as an automobile showroom and service center into the 1960’s. The two-story building was designed by Detroit architect, W. A. Borch, in a Neo-Classic-Contempory style.

Today, through rehabilitation, the old structure has found new life, helping shape lives in the community, as the headquarters for the Greater Cleveland YWCA. In 2002, the building received the prestigious Preservation Merit Award, and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places for it’s architectural significance. Just one of the many wonderful historically preserved sites breathing new life into Cleveland’s Upper Prospect Historic District.

From the top:
Photos 1, 2, and 7 taken May 28, 2015
Photo 3 taken April 2, 2015
Photos 4, 5, and 6 taken May 4, 2015


“Peace on the earth, good will to men… from heaven’s all gracious King…”



“It Came Upon the Midnight Clear” – Johnny Mathis (1958)

Severance Hall
11001 Euclid Avenue
University Circle
Cleveland, Ohio
The home of the Cleveland Orchestra
Building completion: 1931
Architects: Walker and Weeks
Concert hall seating: 2,000

Photos taken December 21, 2014


“Hark! The herald angels sing… Glory to the newborn King!'”


“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” – A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965)

The Palace Theatre lobby at Playhouse Square in downtown Cleveland.

Photo taken December 18, 2014


“…oh, there’s more to life than books, you know… but not much more.. not much more…”




“Handsome Devil” – THE SMITHS (1983)

For over 100 years, this Italianate Style antebellum home has been more than just a “page” in Cleveland’s written history. The ornately detailed house was built in 1838 for early Cleveland settler George Merwin. After changing owners a few different times after Mr. Merwin’s death, the house became the headquarters and library for a very exclusive private gentleman’s club in 1892. This organization, The Rowfant Club, is still in existence today at this location on Prospect Avenue near East 30th Street.

Dedicated to “primarily the critical study of books in their various capacities to please the mind of man…”, the “by-invitation-only” bibliophile aficionado membership of the Rowfant Club has convened at the Merwin House over the decades for meetings, ceremonies, lectures, or just to simply relax with one of the books from the club’s extensive in-house private library collection. Members of note have included James Ford Rhodes, Charles F. Schweinfurth, and William G. Mather.

Top 3 photos taken November 25, 2014
Bottom 2 photos taken June 16, 2014


“You are pulled from the wreckage of your silent reverie… You’re in the arms of an angel… may you find some comfort here.”


“Angel” – Sarah McLachlan (1998)

The above Photo taken November 10, 2014

One of the many historic homes that have been saved from demolition by the Cleveland Restoration Society and local community involvement. The organization took over the dilapidated, condemned property from the City in 1996 to ensure that the Cleveland Landmark would not be destroyed. In 1998, Cleveland residents James Graham and David Dusek purchased the home and embarked upon a visionary, expansive restoration project that has resulted in the wonderful rebirth of this beautiful century home.

The house adorns the corner of South Boulevard and East 98th Street, at the western edges of Cleveland’s Glenville neighborhood, near East Avenue and the Cleveland Cultural Gardens. Built in 1903 as a “summer home” for wealthy Cleveland businessman, Edwin Potter, it was one of many grand houses built in that area by architect George Kauffman and The Kauffman Architectural Company.

“The Potter Home” is a modern day success story in amongst too many sad cases of beautiful, historic old structures dying into “forgotten-ness.” The Cleveland Restoration Society and other agencies and private citizens like Mr. Graham and Mr. Dusek, truly are the “arms of an angel” to Cleveland history, architecture, and culture and to the many structures that they have saved from the wrecking ball.

An excellent interview with James Graham and David Dusek, inside this house, and a bit more about it and the neighborhood can be found in this video:


“…join us in our blind ambition… get yourself a brand new motor car…”



“Grand Illusion” – Styx (1977)

In the City of Cleveland, at the corner of Carnegie Avenue and E. 46th street there sits a another small reminder of the city’s fashionable past. Built in 1917, at a cost of $200,000, the Pierce-Arrow Motor Car building served as one the city’s automobile showrooms for the “well-to-do” until 1938, when the Buffalo-based Pierce-Arrow Motor Corporation was formally liquidated.

During the automobile company’s tenure, the Pierce-Arrow “motor car” was a luxurious status symbol, prized by Hollywood millionaires, business tycoons and American Presidents alike.

The two story structure on the city’s near east side was designed in Classic Italian Renaissance style with and an eye-catching white glazed terra cotta exterior facade, by the Cleveland architectural firm Lehman and Schmitt, who also designed the Cuyahoga County Courthouse.

Photos taken October 9, 2014


“What moments divine… what rapture serene…”



















“Begin the Beguine” – (Cole Porter) recorded by Frank Sinatra (1944)

From inside the Alcazar Hotel, at the corner of Surrey and Derbyshire Road, in Cleveland Heights–19 photos in black and white capturing some of the elaborate detail to this one time posh home to Cleveland’s upper crust and destination for visiting stars on tour. Cole Porter and George Gershwin– to name a couple. Built during the roaring 20’s, today the rooms and suites have mostly been converted into apartment and office dwellings, but the Alcazar still operates as a hotel. A place that you don’t have to try too hard to imagine the socialite parties that must have taken place here during the Hotel’s hey day during the 1920’s and 30’s.

Another photo of the exterior and more information about the building can be found in an entry I posted here early last year entitled, “Get Out of Town”, (without apology–another Cole Porter song!)

Photos taken August 15, 2014


“…forcin’ a light into all those stoney faces left stranded on this warm July.”








“4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)” – Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band (1973)

Eight photos capturing the essence of the Caxton Building, built in 1903.

Located at 812 Huron Road in downtown Cleveland, the 8-story structure was built specifically to house several Cleveland-based commercial printing and graphic-arts businesses. Several of the floors were designed to bear 300 pounds per sq. ft to accommodate the heavy printing machinery used by these tenants.

The beauty of the Romanesque architecture style terra cotta archway framing the main entrance really is striking. Designed by local architect, Frank Seymour Barnum, (who is noted for his work as architect and Superintendent of Buildings for the Cleveland Public Schools,) the Caxton Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and designated as a Cleveland landmark in 1976.

Photos taken July 17, 2014


“Let the stories be told… let them say what they want… let the photos be old… let them show what they want…”


This photo is taken from the promotional booklet entitled “Then and now, the story of the Cleveland Leader and the Cleveland News” printed in 1913

“Let the Good Times Roll” – The Cars (1978)

On October 21, 1911, ground was broken at the corner of East 6th Street and Superior Avenue for what was later hailed as “the finest Newspaper plant and Office Building in the world”– home to two local newspapers, The Cleveland News, and The Cleveland Leader.

Designed by architect Charles Adams Platt, the Fifteen-floor building rises above a beautifully detailed lobby complete with Famousa marble flooring, imported from Germany, and elegant Bronze grill work, throughout.

The fate of the two newspapers was eventually taken over by current daily Cleveland Newspaper, The Plain Dealer, after a series of mergers and acquisitions.

Today the building provides office space for Cleveland’s bustling downtown business district.

Photos taken June 9, 2014